One of the most acclaimed film scores of recent decades will be heard live for the first time as the Royal Albert Hall presents The English Patient Live.

The beloved 1996 epic, which scooped nine Oscars including best score, is the latest movie to be celebrated in the venue’s hugely popular Films in Concert strand, after the likes of Jurassic Park, Lord of the Rings and The Godfather.

The world premiere of The English Patient Live in October will see Gabriel Yared’s memorable music – which also claimed a BAFTA, Golden Globe and Grammy – performed live on stage by one of the world’s leading orchestras, conducted by Ludwig Wicki. The composer will also discuss his experiences working on the film in an on-stage discussion as part of the event.

Lucy Noble, Artistic Director at the Royal Albert Hall, said: “We’re thrilled to present one of the most iconic films of the ‘90s as it deserves to be seen – and heard. It’s a lyrical, sweeping, romantic blockbuster with a score to match, and so a natural choice for our acclaimed Films in Concert programme.”

The English Patient is the fifth film to be confirmed for the venue’s 2018 Films in Concert slate, alongside Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, and a trio of movies screening as part of the Festival of Science: Space – Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Star Trek, and Star Trek Beyond.

Each film will be shown in full and in HD on a 30-foot screen in the Hall’s grand Victorian auditorium, accompanied by a live orchestra bringing the unforgettable music to life.

The English Patient is a sweeping World War II romance, set against the breathtaking backdrops of North Africa and Italy, that sees a badly-burned pilot (Ralph Fiennes) recounting his all-consuming love affair with a married woman (Kristin Scott Thomas).

Its nine Oscars included Best Picture, Director (Anthony Minghella), Supporting Actress (Juliette Binoche), Score and Cinematography (John Seale), while both its stars were shortlisted for acting gongs.

As well as entering the fabric of popular culture – being referenced in the likes of Seinfeld and Father Ted – it was lauded by critics, including Roger Ebert, who gave it 4/4 and called it “the kind of movie you can see twice – first for the questions, the second time for the answers”.